Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Obama's Plan For Immigration Reform Similar To U.S. Senate Bipartisan Plan

Obama's immigration reform plan calls for strengthening border security, pathway to citizenship, stiff penalties and enforcement of laws prohibiting employers from hiring illegal workers and to streamline the legal immigration system.

By H. Nelson Goodson
January 29, 2013

Las Vegas, Neveda - On Tuesday, President Barack H. Obama introduced his four part plan for immigration reform. Obama spoke in front of mayors, religious leaders, union workers, immigrant rights groups, Latino community organizers and leaders from around the country. 
The president's immigration plan is similar to the bipartisan plan that was unveiled yesterday by U.S. Senators. Obama's plan also  includes; First, continue to strengthen our borders. Second, crack down on companies that hire undocumented workers. Third, hold undocumented immigrants accountable before they can earn their citizenship; this means requiring undocumented workers to pay their taxes and a penalty, move to the back of the line, learn English, and pass background checks. Fourth, streamline the legal immigration system for families, workers, and employers.
Obama addressed a crowd at the Del Sol High School and told them, "I'm here because most Americans agree that it's time to fix a system that's been broken for way too long.  I'm here because business leaders, faith leaders, labor leaders, law enforcement, and leaders from both parties are coming together to say now is the time to find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see America as the land of opportunity.  Now is the time to do this so we can strengthen our economy and strengthen our country's future...
"Right now, we have 11 million undocumented immigrants in America; 11 million men and women from all over the world who live their lives in the shadows.  Yes, they broke the rules.  They crossed the border illegally.  Maybe they overstayed their visas.  Those are facts.  Nobody disputes them.  But these 11 million men and women are now here.  Many of them have been here for years.  And the overwhelming majority of these individuals aren't looking for any trouble.  They're contributing members of the community.  They're looking out for their families.  They're looking out for their neighbors.  They're woven into the fabric of our lives...
"Now, of course, there will be rigorous debate about many of the details, and every stakeholder should engage in real give and take in the process.  But it's important for us to recognize that the foundation for bipartisan action is already in place.  And if Congress is unable to move forward in a timely fashion, I will send up a bill based on my proposal and insist that they vote on it right away...
"First, I believe we need to stay focused on enforcement.  That means continuing to strengthen security at our borders.  It means cracking down more forcefully on businesses that knowingly hire undocumented workers.  To be fair, most businesses want to do the right thing, but a lot of them have a hard time figuring out who's here legally, who's not.  So we need to implement a national system that allows businesses to quickly and accurately verify someone's employment status.  And if they still knowingly hire undocumented workers, then we need to ramp up the penalties.
"Second, we have to deal with the 11 million individuals who are here illegally.  We all agree that these men and women should have to earn their way to citizenship.  But for comprehensive immigration reform to work, it must be clear from the outset that there is a pathway to citizenship.
We've got to lay out a path -- a process that includes passing a background check, paying taxes, paying a penalty, learning English, and then going to the back of the line, behind all the folks who are trying to come here legally.  That's only fair, right?
So that means it won't be a quick process but it will be a fair process.  And it will lift these individuals out of the shadows and give them a chance to earn their way to a green card and eventually to citizenship.
"And the third principle is we've got to bring our legal immigration system into the 21st century because it no longer reflects the realities of our time.  For example, if you are a citizen, you shouldn't have to wait years before your family is able to join you in America.  You shouldn't have to wait years.
If you're a foreign student who wants to pursue a career in science or technology, or a foreign entrepreneur who wants to start a business with the backing of American investors, we should help you do that here.  Because if you succeed, you'll create American businesses and American jobs.  You'll help us grow our economy.  You'll help us strengthen our middle class. 
"So that's what comprehensive immigration reform looks like:  smarter enforcement; a pathway to earned citizenship; improvements in the legal immigration system so that we continue to be a magnet for the best and the brightest all around the world.  It's pretty straightforward," Obama said.

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